• Monday, May 20, 2024

Health

Study predicts prostate cancer cases will double by 2040

Unlike some other cancers, such as lung cancer or heart disease, prostate cancer is less influenced by public health policies due to its largely hereditary nature. (Representative image: iStock)

Vibhuti PathakBy: Vibhuti Pathak

A Lancet report published on Friday predicts a significant surge in new prostate cancer cases worldwide over the next two decades. The study forecasts that annual new cases will more than double from 1.4 million in 2020 to 2.9 million by 2040. Researchers attribute this rise to demographic shifts, particularly in developing countries where populations are ageing.

Prostate cancer, the most prevalent cancer among men, constitutes approximately 15 per cent of all cases. Its incidence typically rises after the age of 50 and increases with advancing age. As life expectancy improves globally, particularly in developing nations, the incidence of prostate cancer is expected to climb accordingly.

Unlike some other cancers, such as lung cancer or heart disease, prostate cancer is less influenced by public health policies due to its largely hereditary nature. While lifestyle factors like obesity have been linked to prostate cancer, their direct impact remains unclear.

The study highlights the importance of early screening initiatives, particularly in developing countries where diagnoses often occur too late for effective treatment. Encouraging proactive screening measures could potentially mitigate the burden of prostate cancer in these regions.

Following recent treatment for an enlarged prostate, King Charles has been diagnosed with a form of cancer, Buckingham Palace confirmed. At 75 years old, the King maintains a positive outlook towards his treatment and aims to resume full public duties at the earliest opportunity.

Prostate cancer stands as the predominant cancer among men in the UK, representing 27 per cent of new cancer cases in males from 2016–2018, as per Cancer Research UK. In 2014 alone, over 46,000 new diagnoses were recorded, constituting 13 per cent of all newly diagnosed cancers. Annually, an average of more than 52,000 men receive prostate cancer diagnoses, equating to 144 men diagnosed every day.

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